My so-called (gay) life

"Small Problem—We’re Not Gay!": Why "Faking It" Will Be Good for the LGBT Community

littleoases:

MTV surprised us all this week when they released the Faking It pilot online for a short—and feverish—48 hours. The new show, slated for the Tuesday night teen crowd, tells the story of best friends Amy and Karma, who pretend to be lesbians in order to reach maximum popularity at their liberal Austin, Texas, high school.

Yeah, I know how that premise sounds, so it’s no wonder the show is stirring up controversy. Most of the Faking It buzz on the web lately has centered around whether the show is doing a service or disservice to the LGBT community.

My opinion? It’s doing us a great service. Read on for my arguments as to why Amy, Karma, and their story are helping visibility and the LGBT cause. 

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The queer history of Eleanor Roosevelt you won't see in the Ken Burns documentary

afterellen:

PBS’s “The Roosevelts” won’t talk about Eleanor’s close relationship with Lorena Hickok.

(Source: deviatesinc)

LGBT People Are Driving an Upheaval in Video Games

(Source: projectqueer)

In his dissenting opinion [of the Supreme Court decision that struck down the federal ban on same-sex marriage], the Honorable Antonin Scalia recognized that this result was the logical outcome of the Court’s ruling in Windsor: ‘In my opinion, however, the view that this Court will take of state prohibition of same-sex marriage is indicated beyond mistaking by today’s opinion. As I have said, the real rationale of today’s opinion … is that [the federal ban on same-sex marriages] is motivated by ‘bare … desire to harm’ couples in same-sex marriages. How easy it is, indeed how inevitable, to reach the same conclusion with regard to state laws denying same-sex couples marital status.’ The court agrees with Justice Scalia’s interpretation of Windsor. … And Justice Scalia even recommended how this court should interpret the Windsor decision when presented with the question that is now before it.

Judge Robert Shelby, in the December 20 opinion against Utah’s same-sex marriage ban (via lgbtqblogs)

(Source: kevinolett)

In time, Americans will look at the marriage of couples such as Plaintiffs, and refer to it simply as a marriage — not a same-sex marriage. These couples, when gender and sexual orientation are taken away, are in all respects like the family down the street. The Constitution demands that we treat them as such. Today, the ‘injustice that [we] had not earlier known or understood’ ends.

US District Judge Richard Young, in the June 25 opinion against Indiana’s same-sex marriage ban (via lgbtqblogs)
gutgemacht:

Because even the composition in Sterek fanart is flawless.

gutgemacht:

Because even the composition in Sterek fanart is flawless.

lgbtqblogs:

Map: Dozens of countries still punish homosexuality with prison and death
Lawmakers in Gambia recently passed a bill that would increase the country’s punishment for some homosexual acts to life imprisonment, reports the Associated Press.

The bill, which reportedly contains language similar to Uganda’s struck-down anti-gay law, now awaits the approval of Gambia President Yahya Jammeh, who’s been openly hostile to the LGBT community in the past. In 2008, he demanded gays and lesbians leave the country or risk having their heads cut off. In February, Jammeh said on state television, “We will fight these vermins called homosexuals or gays the same way we are fighting malaria-causing mosquitoes, if not more aggressively.”
While the actions and comments of Gambia’s leaders are shocking, they are far from alone in

lgbtqblogs:

Map: Dozens of countries still punish homosexuality with prison and death

Lawmakers in Gambia recently passed a bill that would increase the country’s punishment for some homosexual acts to life imprisonment, reports the Associated Press.

The bill, which reportedly contains language similar to Uganda’s struck-down anti-gay law, now awaits the approval of Gambia President Yahya Jammeh, who’s been openly hostile to the LGBT community in the past. In 2008, he demanded gays and lesbians leave the country or risk having their heads cut off. In February, Jammeh said on state television, “We will fight these vermins called homosexuals or gays the same way we are fighting malaria-causing mosquitoes, if not more aggressively.”

While the actions and comments of Gambia’s leaders are shocking, they are far from alone in

Man caught drinking Bailey's Irish Cream jailed for 'being a homosexual'

(Source: gay-men)

Where will this all lead? I know that many suggest we are going down a slippery slope that will have no moral boundaries. To those who truly harbor such fears, I can only say this: Let us look less to the sky to see what might fall; rather, let us look to each other … and rise.

US District Judge Michael McShane, in the May 19 opinion against Oregon’s same-sex marriage ban (via lgbtqblogs)

New Study Shows Suppressing Puberty Helps Transgender Teens Become Happier Young Adults

trans-parenting:

No surprises here - if trans people are supported & given access to early treatment that can make transition and life in their preferred gender easier they go on to lead happier lives.  Puberty blocking hormones are generally administered to children starting somewhere between the age of 12-16 (depending on the country/doctor/etc.) through age 18 when they can then pursue gender confirmation surgeries.  And while critics have decried this practice as “child abuse” I hope studies like these will help to prove that this is a very necessary and reasonable approach to treatment for those who need it.

While I probably would not have sought out these options specifically, whenever I see articles like this it makes me wonder what kind of choices and opportunities I would have had if trans issues had been more visible, understood, and normalized when I was a teen.

t-eenagewitch:

saying trans women cant be lesbians is saying women can’t be lesbians

trans women are still women

Why Transphobia Is a Feminist Issue

transqueermediaexchange:

We used to hear the saying, “As General Motors goes, so goes the nation,” but to gauge where we stand and where we’re going as a society, maybe we should substitute “Netflix” for the automaker’s name.

Consider the case of transgender rights. This is a landscape that is rapidly changing, breaking convention, busting stereotypes and forcing new ways of thinking on large segments of the population.

Laverne Cox, one of the stars of Netflix’s “Orange Is the New Black" and the first openly transgender Emmy nominee in the acting category, may not have won the award this year, but history has already been made. Cox appeared on the cover ofTIME Magazine and her show isn’t even the only major TV show to feature transgender characters and storylines. The new dramatic comedy “Transparent” debuts on Amazon Prime on September 26, starring Jeffrey Tambor as a father preparing to come out as transgender to his three children.

The degree to which social institutions, the media and governments recognize the civil and human rights of the transgender community is increasingly in the spotlight.

President Barack Obama recently signed an executive order prohibiting transgender federal workers from discrimination, and the Affordable Care Act prohibits health insurance companies from discriminating against transgender people, opening the door to coverage that includes gender reassignment surgery.

The Washington Post has launched an advice column on LGBT/straight etiquette. The U.S. Department of Education announced that Title IX protects transgender students. And Facebook opened gender options for transgender and gender non-conforming users.

But it’s not all good news. We’re also seeing historic levels of transphobia—discrimination, hate speech and violent, even fatal attacks on transgender women and men.

According to the report "Injustice at Every Turn" published by the National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force:

    • Transgender people experienced unemployment at twice the rate of the general population, “with rates for people of color up to four times the national unemployment rate.”
    • Ninety percent of transgender people reported experiencing harassment, mistreatment or discrimination on the job.
    • Twenty-two percent of respondents who have interacted with police reported harassment by police, “with much higher rates reported by people of color.”

    • Almost half of the respondents (46 percent) reported being uncomfortable seeking police assistance.
  • Forty-one percent of respondents reported attempting suicide, compared to 1.6 percent of the general population.

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